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September 16th 2016

Greetings and welcome to this weeks Climate for Peace newsletter...

We have an exciting selection this week exploring the possibilities of shifting into a more compassionate society where the land and animals are treated with the same respect and care as we would treat our family and friends...September 21st is UN International Peace Day with this year being a focus on "The Sustainable Development Goals: Building Blocks for Peace" take a look at the effect the fashion industry has on the decline of our natural world...also the unfortunate decline in our environment since the industrial era began! Have you ever wondered how to build a sustainable homestead? We share the best methods to do so and check out what the World Peace Diet is doing for our planet...

Dive in and explore our Climate for Peace articles this week! You can find out more at sci.ngo and have a look at our workcamps website. Happy reading!

How the fashion industry and consumer culture are destroying our environment
10% of the world's wilderness has been lost since the 1990s
Massive bee death as South Carolina spray for Zika death
7 Incredible examples of sustainability in Sweden
How to build a self sustaining home

How the Fashion Industry and Consumer Culture Are Destroying Our Environment

With both cheap clothing lines and high-end brands proliferating in countries like Italy, U.S., Japan and Hong Kong, the fashion industry indeed has a big influence around the world. But before you go splurging on the clothes you've been eyeing for some time now, or before you book your ticket for some bargain shopping in Thailand, ask yourself first, did you know that the fashion industry is destroying the environment? Greenpeace International has shown some concern on the hazards of the growing fashion industry. Although there's nothing wrong with shopping and wanting to dress well, there are consequences when it comes to making the clothing people wear.Read more here

10% of the world's wilderness has been lost since the 1900's

Modern homo sapiens have been on the planet for over 100,000 years, but we've destroyed one-tenth of the globe's wilderness over the past 20. When modern humans popped into the scene some 150,000+ years ago, suffice to say there was plenty of wilderness. But as we’ve evolved over the millennia, so has our landscape. To wit, a staggering new study from the Wildlife Conservation Society has found that only about 20 percent of the world's land area (30.1 million km2) is all that remains as wilderness. For the research, wilderness is defined as “biologically and ecologically intact landscapes free of any significant human disturbance.” Read more here

Massive bee death as South Carolina spray for Zika virus

There is no question that people are justifiably freaked out by the ominous threat of the Zika virus and the mosquitoes that deliver it. Many of us remember when trucks spewing pesticide first took to the streets in order to battle the threat of mosquitoes transmitting West Nile virus, before that it was DDT for malaria; with the new mayhem of Zika on the rise, some areas have become more vigilant than ever in their municipal spraying. In South Carolina, to disastrous end.Read more here

7 Incredible examples of sustainability in Sweden

Sweden’s shift from oil to district heating in the early 1990’s is perhaps the single most important factor in explaining the country’s reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, both in the housing and service sector. Today, district heating accounts for more than 80 per cent of the heat and hot water provided to Sweden’s apartment blocks. Centralising the way buildings are heated and cooled through a main source means that the central plant can be advanced to use more sustainable and clean forms of fuel. Many district heating networks also make use of recycled heat from industries – energy that would otherwise go to waste.Read more here

How to build a self sustaining home

More than four decades ago, a lone architect had what must have seemed at the time like an impossible dream: to build a new kind of residence that would be in complete harmony with the planet. This home would be made with recycled and sustainable materials. It would rely on clean energy and renewable resources to supply its inhabitants with the most basic and essential of needs. It would be designed to be affordable and utilize construction techniques that are so simple that anyone could build it.Centralising the way buildings are heated and cooled through a main source means that the central plant can be advanced to use more sustainable and clean forms of fuel. Many district heating networks also make use of recycled heat from industries – energy that would otherwise go to waste.Read more here

 

Co-Funded by the Erasmus plus programme of the European Union.

 

The Association of Service Civil International ivzw receives financial support from the European Youth Foundation of the Council of Europe.

 

 


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