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19th August 2016

Hello SCI friends and welcome to our Climate for Peace newsletter, please feel free to share and feel inspired by our articles this week.

We take a look at Exxon one of the biggest oil companies and there relationship towards renewable methods of energy, the indigenous people and how they are rising up more than ever as tides begin to turn in the world's energy system also how hemp can be a far greater alternative to plastic plus many more enjoyable articles.

Dig in, relax and become inspired! You can find out a lot more at sci.ngo and visit our workcamps website to find out so much more on how you can become a friend our only bluey/green planet we call home. Enjoy!

Exxon scramble to contain climate crusade
The art of sustainable living
Indigenous people and climate change
The truth about our oceans
Wildfires are an ever increasing occurrence in our world

Exxon scramble to contain climate crusade

Just five days before the meeting on Capitol Hill, Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton had urged the Justice Department to investigate whether the petroleum giant spent decades deceiving the public about the threat of climate change. State attorneys general had Exxon in their sights as well, preparing to issue subpoenas that would eventually rope in virtually all of Washington’s conservative policy apparatus. A four-year effort by green activists, scientists and lawyers to turn Big Oil’s biggest player into the poster child for climate change — deliberately patterned after the successful campaign to take down tobacco — was shaking the descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil empire to its core.Read more here

The art of sustainable living

Click on the dumpster diving crews picture to see Rob Greenfield's off the grid bike ride across America on a bamboo bicycle where he practiced sustainable living to the extreme. In 4,700 miles of cycling he used just 160 gallons of water, burned less than one gallon of gas, never turned on a light switch and created only 2 pounds of trash. That is 80x less water, 200x less trash, 600x less fossil fuels, and 1,000 times less electricity than the average American! Plus he ate nearly 300 pounds of food from grocery store dumpsters to prove just how much perfectly good food is being wasting in the USA.

Indigenous people and climate change

Just five years ago, governments, pundits, and the general public were talking about climate change—to the extent they were talking about it at all—as a vague issue that was open to question. Today it is not just accepted as a fact; it is seen as a crisis. But indigenous peoples have known for decades that climate change is happening, and they know better than most exactly what it means.Read more here

The truth about our oceans

We dump more garbage into the ocean, than the tonnage of fish we take out. We can choose to stop doing that and that will be one less pollutant choking our seas. Oil spills often come to mind when thinking about ocean pollution. In addition to the short-term impacts, severe long-term problems can also result. The Exxon Valdez, ran aground in Alaska in 1989, but the damage to marine life and waters of Prince William Sound can still be seen today. The Prestige oil tanker, which sank off the Spanish coast in 2002, was an environmental and economic disaster - destroying the local fishing industry and massively affecting local tourism after polluting more than 100 beaches in France and Spain.Read more here

Wildfires are an ever increasing occurrence in our world

Uncontrolled blazes fueled by weather, wind, and dry underbrush, wildfires can burn acres of land—and consume everything in their paths—in mere minutes. On average, more than 100,000 wildfires, also called wildland fires or forest fires, clear 4 million to 5 million acres (1.6 million to 2 million hectares) of land in the U.S. every year. In recent years, wildfires have burned up to 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land. A wildfire moves at speeds of up to 14 miles an hour (23 kilometers an hour), consuming everything—trees, brush, homes, even humans—in its path.Read more here

 

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