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17th June 2016

Hello SCI family and welcome to this week's Climate for Peace Newsletter!

We share with you our top stories in the world of climate, environment and sustainable living. We work everyday towards a peaceful environment. This is our highest passion, to live in a world where violence and conflict are a thing of the past, never to be repeated. With so much seperation we see in the world we always have a choice. To come together or to put more locks on the door. Remember that all the great teachings in the world share similiar truths in common, that what you think has a major influence on the world you experience and also how we treat others does in fact come back to how others treat us. This is why living in peace and gratitude is so powerful in our world!

Enjoy this week's newsletter and visit our website for more information about our Climate for Peace Programme and the workcamps database to explore our huge selection of sustainable workcamp opportunities!


The environmental cost of Obama's proposed oil drilling
India to invest over 6 billion into reforestation
Taking CO2 deep underground into volcanic bedrock
Students learn to grow and cook their own food
Monsanto's 50 years of death is about to end

The environmental cost of Obama's proposed oil drilling

The Obama administration’s proposed expansion of oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico would result in hefty climate-related social costs, a new report found. In fact, those costs, estimated at $58.6 billion to $179.2 billion, may outweigh the economic benefits of selling the energy, according to Tim Donaghy, lead author of the report.The proposed oil and gas program for 2017 to 2022 includes 13 potential lease sales — 10 in the Gulf and one each in Alaska’s Cook Inlet, Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea. In March, the White House abandoned plans to include the Atlantic Coast in the upcoming sale.Read more here

India To invest over $6 Billion into reforestation

As a rule of thumb, a tree can absorb 48 lbs of CO2 per year and lock away 1 ton of CO2 in the first 40 years of its life. Using this very rough estimate, India would have to plant 62.5 million trees and grow them to 40 years old to capture the target 2.6 billion tons of carbon. An ambitious goal, but not impossible with the aforementioned funding dedicated to this one purpose. The key is oversight to ensure compliance and monitor progress in a country that has dealt with its fair share of corruption. Read more here

Taking CO2 deep underground into volcanic bedrock

Time to get your science hat on as scientists in Columbia University, University of Iceland, University of Toulouse and Reykjavik Energy have now demonstrated CO2 can be permanently and rapidly locked away from the atmosphere, by injecting it into volcanic bedrock. Measures to tackle the problem of increasing greenhouse gas emissions and resultant climate change are numerous. One approach is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), where CO2 is physically removed from the atmosphere and trapped underground. Geoengineers have long explored the possibility of sealing CO2 gas in voids underground, such as in abandoned oil and gas reservoirs, but these are susceptible to leakage. So attention has now turned to the mineralisation of carbon to permanently dispose of CO2. Read more here

Students learn to grow and cook their own food

Students at one San Fransisco school will soon have the chance to learn about urban farming and the role it can play in the community in a unique setting. The Golden Bridges School‘s planned new campus will join indoor and outdoor learning spaces and will have several beneficial and environmentally friendly aspects. The property is currently an urban farm, which was started six years ago by Caitlyn Galloway, the San Fransisco Examiner reported. Galloway hoped to prove urban farms could turn a profit as well as unite a neighborhood. The property is currently an urban farm, which was started six years ago by Caitlyn Galloway, the San Fransisco Examiner reported. Galloway hoped to prove urban farms could turn a profit as well as unite a neighborhood. Read more here

Monsanto's 50 years of death is about to end

Now, for the first time in those two decades, the number of acres planted with genetically modified (GMO) crops is down. Efforts to label GMO foods are gaining momentum. Family and community farms are taking off. Nearly 40 countries have banned GMO crops and use of Monsanto’s keystone product, Roundup (glyphosate), may not be re-approved by the Food and Drug Administration, while the European Union has done so on a restricted basis. Read more here

 

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The Association of Service Civil International ivzw receives financial support from the European Youth Foundation of the Council of Europe.

 

 


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