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Service Civil International

February 2016

Welcome to the first edition of Voices of Volunteers for 2016. The final event of the Memoric project just finished and a big seminar is taking place in Hong Kong at the moment. Many things happened the last months and our volunteers continue to give their spirit through workcamps and activities all over the world, Hong Kong, Scotland, Italy, Ukraine are some of the destinations. They share their stories and we hope that they will inspire you. Sparking question of this edition…When was the last time that you did something for first time? Relax and enjoy…

Happy reading!

Today I am happy Volunteer!
Global Citizenship Camp & Human Library
Shared Home for Displaced Ukrainians
Greetings from Valec
Volunteer voice from Scotland
A voice from Kurdistan
Together we were the Bramble Busters!
From the Archives

Today I am happy Volunteer!

My name is Bakary and I was born and raised in Gambia, I came alone to Italy in April 2011 by Lampedusa – I was 16. I was rescued by Save the Children Association and taken to a camp of tents for refugees. I decided to help those who arrive in the same situation as I did, so I became an intercultural mediator. I help as an interpreter of minor refugees and I am the bridge between them and the various judicial, educational, health services. It's something that gives me a great pleasure to do. Read the whole article.

Global Citizenship Camp & Human Library

Last summer (2015) I took part in my second workcamp abroad, this time with SCI Hellas. I wanted a destination that was far away and different from back home, so, I chose Hong Kong, because I had never been in Asia before and because the project running there seemed very interesting and something I would enjoy being part of and offering my help. The title of the workcamp was “Global Citizenship Camp & Human Library”. It’s first part was a Human Library event that took place in various primary and secondary schools in many different areas of Hong Kong (Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and New Territories). Read more.

Shared Home for Displaced Ukrainians

The door I’m looking for hides over the corner of a noisy market street in the center of Kharkov. It’s my first visit to the hostel for the refugees from Donbas conflict zone. Locals call them IDPs, or “displaced”. A busy looking young woman of about 20 walks out before I get the chance to knock. “Hi. Do you know if the international volunteers are here”. She frowns, and shakes her head, “What volunteers? No, they are gone, they moved.” I called twenty minutes ago, and they were here. She lets me in when learns I’m their coordinator. Click here for the whole article.

Greetings from Valec

Hello everybody, Today is our day off and the first rainy day so I got a chance to write. I am sitting in my tent, trying to keep it dry inside and the ants out. The tent is in the middle of an orchard with sheep bleeping all around me. I try to save the apples from them. The orchard is on a sort of organic farm below a beautiful castle in a park land with old trees and even older statues. You hear a woodpecker all the time and an owl at night. In the ruin of an old brewery 10 types of bats hibernate. Read more.

Volunteer voice from Scotland

I was a long-term volunteer as a peer mentor with the Cyrenians at the residential city community in Edinburgh, supporting people who have experienced homelessness. It was a very challenging project, sometimes a lot more than I expected and was prepared for. Yet, in many ways it was also more rewarding and dynamic that I thought. I met a lot of great people and had a lot of support from our international team of volunteers, the staff and even people at IVS offering mentorship and advice. Read the rest here.

A voice from Kurdistan

It's evening, and after a 5 hours flight I land in Diyarbakir. Why have I come here, in the Turkish Kurdistan? I knew I would work in the camp with other volunteers, along with Yazidi refugees fled from Mount Sinjar. I also knew that in the camp there are about 4,000 refugees, 1,500 of whom are children. What I did not know was the humanity I would find here. Let's start explaining it! Read more.

Together we were the Bramble Busters!

After two weeks of hard work and a lot of fun, we had made some good friends at Monkton Wyld Court and we became good friends ourselves. The Spanish girls turned our Japanese volunteer in to a Flamenca by teaching her to clap the Flamenco rhythm and sing the songs. I learned to use a Scythe and did a good impression of Ekrots Death in the Seventh Seal. Together we were the Bramble Busters! I had a great time on my first Service Civil International (SCI) volunteer project! For the full article read here.

From the Archives

Cheap jack 92 – the city guide to east and west. As I dare to derive from its title, this small booklet uniting Lonely-Planet-style advice and, perhaps even unintendedly, ironic cliché, was issued in 1992, just after the end of the cold war, the establishment of plenty of formerly rather unknown nation-states on the territory of the former Soviet Union. But the booklet also has exactly 92 pages. One may call it a modest SCI contribution to enable young people from both parts of a possibly unifying Europe to discover the other part.

 

 Co-Funded by the Erasmus plus programme of the European Union.
 The Association of Service Civil International ivzw receives financial support from the European Youth Foundation of the Council of Europe.

 

 

 


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